You might want to watch the following videos. Watching these ourselves long ago helped us realize that we had to make drastic changes in our lifestyle in order to be more healthy. From there, we realized that there are many things that need to be changed to achieve real sustainability. We hope that you will enjoy watching these. You do not need to take everything for granted but use these to have a critical look on what you’re seeing around you in the consumption society and reflect on the impact of your own lifestyle changes.

Fat Sick and Nearly Dead.

100 pounds overweight, loaded up on steroids and suffering from a debilitating autoimmune disease, Joe Cross is at the end of his rope and the end of his hope. In the mirror he saw a 310lb man whose gut was bigger than a beach ball and a path laid out before him that wouldn’t end well- with one foot already in the grave, the other wasn’t far behind. Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead is an inspiring film that chronicles Joe’s personal mission to regain his health. With doctors and conventional medicines unable to help long-term, Joe turns to the only option left, the body’s ability to heal itself. He trades in the junk food and hits the road with juicer and generator in tow, vowing only to drink fresh fruit and vegetable juice for the next 60 days.

Food inc.

The current method of raw food production is largely a response to the growth of the fast food industry since the 1950s. The production of food overall has more drastically changed since that time than the several thousand years prior. Controlled primarily by a handful of multinational corporations, the global food production business – with an emphasis on the business – has as its unwritten goals. Health and safety are often overlooked by the companies, and are often overlooked by government in an effort to provide cheap food regardless of these negative consequences. Food Inc is providing a comprehensive investigation on the danger of such approach.

Forks over knives.


What has happened to us? Despite the most advanced medical technology in the world, we are sicker than ever by nearly every measure. Cases of diabetes are exploding, especially amongst our younger population. About half of us are taking at least one prescription drug and major medical operations have become routine. Heart disease, cancer and stroke are the country’s three leading causes of death, even though billions are spent each year to “battle” these very conditions. Millions suffer from a host of other degenerative diseases. Could it be there’s a single solution to all of these problems? A solution so comprehensive, but so utterly straightforward, that it’s mind-boggling that more of us haven’t taken it seriously? Forks over knives examines the profound claim that most, if not all, of the so-called “diseases of affluence” that afflict us can be controlled, or even reversed, by rejecting our present menu of animal-based and processed foods.

Dying to have known.

Master filmmaker Steve Kroschel, intrigued by a stunning statement from his last documentary, sets out to find hard evidence of the effectiveness of the Gerson Therapy, a long-suppressed natural cancer cure. His travels take him across both the Atlantic and the Pacific Oceans, from upstate New York to San Diego to Alaska, from Japan and Holland to Spain and Mexico. In the end, he presents the testimony of patients, scientists, surgeons and nutritionists who testify to the effectiveness of the Gerson Therapy in curing cancer and other degenerative diseases, and show the hard scientific evidence to back up their claims. The question that remains is, “Why is this powerful curative therapy still suppressed, more than 75 years after it was clearly proven to cure degenerative disease?”